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American Institutes of Architects Has Built Up the Architecture Profession

     As the leading professional organization for the architecture profession, the American Institute of Architects represents and advocates on behalf of architects. The organization also helps promote architectural education and fosters relationships with the public as well as with other professions and trades.

The AIA has its origins in a meeting of thirteen architects who sought to create a professional association for the profession. Founded in New York in 1857, AIA was founded in part to regulate the quality of architectural services, as as the time architecture was entirely unregulated and anyone could hire themselves out as a professional architect no matter their qualifications or experience.

For over a century, the American Institute of Architects has presided over the growth of the profession, with three hundred active chapters throughout the country. Although all licensed architects can become professional members, only a few carry the distinction of “Fellow.” In fact, just 2% of the membership has been recognized with this honor.

One fellow of the American Institute of Architects is Robert Ivy. Appointed in 2011, Robert Ivy is the current CEO and Vice President of the AIA. Although his undergraduate degree is in English, Ivy attended architecture school at Tulane University, graduating in 1979. He soon worked his way through the ranks of the profession, becoming a well-regarded architect and critic, and eventually becoming editor-in-chief of Architectural Record. Under Robert Ivy’s aegis, the publication became an industry standard, winning a number of editorial and industry-specific awards. Thanks to Ivy, the journal has now become one of the world’s largest architectural magazines in circulation and influence.

Through his work at the magazine, Ivy became Vice President and Editorial director of McGraw-Hill’s construction division. While with McGraw Hill, he was responsible for more than 30 industry publications. Robert Ivy is also a published author. In 1992, the architect released a book about the work of Wright protege Fay E. Jones entitled Fay Jones: Architect. In addition to his record of publication, Ivy is also active in academia, serving on the boards of several architecture schools. A fellow of the Design Futures Council, Ivy is a member of most of the major invitation-only groups associated with architecture.